Water-based exercise and low-intensity exercise in conjunction with blood flow restriction

Water-based exercise and low-intensity exercise in conjunction with blood flow restriction (BFR) are two methods that have independently been shown to improve muscle strength in those of advancing age. strength which was not observed with water-based exercise alone and (2) water-based exercise regardless of the application of BFR increased functional performance measured by the timed up and go test over a control group. Although we used a healthy population in the current study these findings may have important implications for those who may be contraindicated to using traditional resistance exercise. Future research should explore this promising modality in these clinical populations. value to control for the family-wise error rate. Significance was set at represent individual mean differences … Functional capacity There was a significant group x time interaction for the timed up and go XAV 939 test (may represent more than one individual if they … Discussion To our knowledge this is the first study to compare the effects of water-based exercises with and without BFR on strength and functional performance in post-menopausal women. The main outcomes were as follows: (1) water-based exercise in combination with BFR significantly increased lower limb maximum strength which was not observed with water-based exercise alone and (2) water-based exercise regardless of the application of BFR increased functional performance measured by the timed up and go test more than a control group. Our research did not look for a significant upsurge in 1RM power XAV 939 with water-based workout in the lack of BFR which can be as opposed to two earlier research (Ambrosini et al. 2010; Tsourlou et al. 2006). For instance Ambrosini et al. (2010) noticed a rise in hip extensor power pursuing 12?weeks of teaching. Furthermore Tsourlou et al. (2006) noticed a 29?% upsurge in leg extensor power pursuing 24?weeks of teaching. In today’s research there have been no significant raises in 1RM strength from pre to post with water exercise only which may be due to the duration of the current study (8?weeks). However a look at the individual responses suggests that some participants did get stronger but the collective group response was quite variable (Fig.?2). In contrast almost every participant in the water exercise?+?BFR group saw an increase in 1RM strength suggesting that BFR was able to provide a sufficient augmentation to the training response of traditional water-based exercise without increasing the exercise load. Regarding the functional capacity results only the timed up and go tests were significantly affected by the training with and without BFR. To our knowledge only one other study in the literature has assessed the effect of strength training with BFR on functional capacity in elderly women (Teixeira et al. 2012). These authors concluded that there were greater improvements in muscle strength in the group training with BFR though both groups improved in the chair stand test. XAV 939 These results are in agreement with the current findings in that we observed an augmentation in 1RM with BFR but not in functional capacity. Outside of the timed up and go test no other measure of functional capacity changed with training. This may be the result of participants being relatively healthy XAV 939 at baseline. Although no previous study had assessed the effect of water-based exercises combined with BFR several studies have evaluated muscle strength (Karabulut et al. 2010; Vechin et al. 2015; Yasuda et al. 2014) and muscle mass (Vechin et al. 2015; Yasuda et al. 2014) in older participants after low-intensity strength training combined with BFR. The data from MKK6 the present study are in line with previous findings (Karabulut et al. 2010) reporting increased strength in the lower body following low-intensity exercise (20?% 1RM) in combination with BFR. The mechanisms behind these effects were not investigated in the current investigation but previous studies suggest that metabolic accumulation-induced fatigue may be playing an important role. To illustrate metabolic accumulation in combination with a reduced oxygen environment may increase recruitment of higher threshold (type II) muscle fibers (Suga et al. 2012; Yasuda et al. 2010). It has also been hypothesized that acute swelling following the application of the cuff may be playing some role in the adaptation. For example Yasuda et al. (Yasuda et al. 2012 2014 provided data that acute changes in muscle swelling may XAV 939 be important for increases in muscle mass following training with BFR. Another potential mechanism is the accumulation of metabolites (e.g. lactate) around.

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